Readings

Selected Readings that Correspond to the Content Areas in the Self Evaluation

The recommended readings are not meant to provide comprehensive information, but were selected as an initial point of instruction. To gain competence within domains, it is expected that further self-study is necessary as part of our ongoing professional development.


Area 1: Developmental Disabilities and ASD

A. Knowledge about general child development.

National Research Council. (2001). Social development. Educating Children with Autism (pp.66-81). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2001). Cognitive development. Educating Children with Autism (pp.82-92). Washington, DC:National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2001). Adaptive behaviors. Educating Children with Autism (pp.103-114). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2001). Problem behaviors. Educating Children with Autism (pp.115-132). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2001). Sensory and motor development. Educating Children with Autism (pp.93-102). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2001). Development of communication. Educating Children with Autism (pp.47-65). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

B. Knowledge about causes, definitions, and functional implication of developmental disabilities

Lord, C., & Spence, S. (2006). Autism spectrum disorders: Phenotype and diagnosis. Understanding Autism: From Basic Neuroscience to Treatment (pp.1-15). Boca Raton, FL: CRC press

Heward, W. L. (2009). The Purpose and Promise of Special Education. In, Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education (9th ed., pp.6-47). Columbus, OH: Pearson.

Wikipedia: Definition of Developmental Disability

C. Knowledge about the characteristics of ASD and criteria used to diagnose ASD.

Quill, K. A. (2000). The complexity of Autism. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 1-20). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

Quill, K. A. (2000). The Child’s Perspective. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 21-37). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

L
ord, C. & Spence S. (2006). Autism Spectrum Disorders: Phenotype and Diagnosis. In S. O. Moldin & J. L.R. Rubenstein (Eds.), Understanding Autism: From Basic Neuroscience to Treatment (pp. 1-23). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group.

Pretzel, R.E., & A.W. Cox (2008). Early identification, screening, and diagnosis of ASD, Parts A & B. In A.W. Cox, D. Hatton, G.A. Williams, & R.E. Pretzel (Eds.)

Foundations of autism spectrum disorders: An online course (Session 3). Chapel Hill, NC: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.

D. Knowledge of current theories about the causes of ASD

Hale, C. M., & Tager-Flusberg, H. (May 2005). Social communication in children with autism: The relationship between theory of mind and discourse development. Autism, 9(2), 157-178.

Bebko, J.M., & Ricciuti, C. (September 2000). Executive Functioning and Memory Strategy Use in Children with Autism: The Influence of Task Constraints on Spontaneous Rehearsal. Autism, 4(3), 299-320.

López, B., Leekam, S.R., & Arts, G.R. (March 2008). How central is central coherence?: Preliminary evidence on the link between conceptual and perceptual processing in children with autism. Autism, 12(2), 159-171.

Grandin, T (2006). The Great Continum (pp. 33-57). Thinking in pictures (2nd ed). New York: Vintage books.

E. Knowledge of historical controversies about the causes.

Eggertson, L. (March 2010). Lancet retracts 12-year-old article linking autism to MMR. CMAJ 182(4).

Fombonne, E. (September 2003). Modern Views of Autism. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 48(8), 503-505.

F. Knowledge of the work of significant contributors to the field of ASD.

Wing, L. (1997). The history of ideas on autism: Legends, myths, & reality. Autism, 1(13).

Grandin, T (2006). The Great Continum (pp. 33-57). Thinking in pictures (2nd ed). New York: Vintage books.

Grandin, T. (2006). Thinking in pictures (2nd ed.). New York: Vintage books.

Collet-Klingenberg, L. (2008). Foundations of communication and social interventions. Chapel Hill, NC: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.

Ian Community. (Date Updated: June 15, 2010). Therapies & Treatments.

Williams, G. A., & Neitzel, J. (2008). Instructional strategies and learning environments. Foundations of autism spectrum disorders. : Chapel Hill, NC: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.

Howlin, P. (October 2003). Practitioner Review: Psychological and Educational Treatments for Autism. The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 39(3), 307-322.

G. Knowledge of factors contributing to quality of life for individuals with ASD.

Ruble, L. A. & Dalrymple, N. J. (Spring 1996). An Alternative View of Outcome in Autism. Focus on Autism and other Developmental Disabilities, 11(1), 3-14.


Area II: Inclusion, Public Policy, and the Service System

A. Knowledge of major legislation regarding education and rights of students with disabilities.

B. Knowledge of structure and function of state and local agencies and groups that serve or advocate for individuals with disabilities.

C. Knowledge of current concepts that are important in education and rights of individuals with disabilities (inclusion, supported services).

Heward, W. L. (2009). The Purpose and Promise of Special Education. In, Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education (9th ed., pp.6-47). Columbus, OH: Pearson.

Nickels, C. (1996). A Gift from Alex- The Art of Belonging: Strategies for Academic & Social Inclusion. In, L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap, Positive Behavioral Support: Including People with Difficult Behavior in the Community (pp. 123-144). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.


Area III: Assessment and IEP Development for Students with ASD

A. Knowledge of the value of collaboration across disciplines and situational assessments in diagnosis and educational planning.

Smith, S.W., Slattery, W.J., & Knopp, T.Y. (August 1993). Beyond the Mandate: Developing Individualized Education Programs That Work for Students with Autism. Focus on Autistic Behavior, 8(3), 1-15.

B. Knowledge of effective use of assessment procedures with individuals with ASD.

Pretzel, R. E., & Cox, A. (2008). Early identification, screening, and diagnosis of ASD, Parts A & B. In A. W. Cox, D. Hatton, G. A. Williams, & R. E. Pretzel (Eds.), Foundations of autism spectrum disorders: An online course (Session 3). Chapel Hill, NC: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.

C. Knowledge of the use of assessment information to design individual objectives that relate to current skills, functional needs age-appropriate curriculum, state academic content standards, and federal guidelines.

Burns, E. (2001). Developing and implementing IDEA-IEPs: An individualized education program (IEP) handbook for meeting individuals with disabilities education act (IDEA) requirements. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.

Smith, S.W., Slattery, W.J., & Knopp, T.Y. (August 1993). Beyond the Mandate: Developing Individualized Education Programs That Work for Students with Autism. Focus on Autistic Behavior, 8(3), 1-15.


Area IV: Programming for Students with ASD

A. Knowledge of evidence-based strategies for teaching students with ASD.

The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (n.d.). What are evidenced based practices (EBP)?

B. Knowledge of ways to design and structure teaching environments and supports that best accommodate the needs of students with ASD.

Quill, K. A. (2000). Strategies to Enhance Social and Communication Skills. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 111-160). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

Heward, W. L. (2009). Early Childhood Special Education. Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education (9th ed., pp.532-563). Columbus, OH:Pearson.

C. Knowledge of how to design individual teaching strategies, interventions, and activities to assure success for each IEP objective.

Ruble, L. A., McGrew, J., Dalrymple, N., & Jung, L.A. (2010). Examining the quality of IEPs for young children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental disorders

D. Knowledge of how to design and maintain a useful, functional data-keeping system relevant to IEP objectives.

E. Knowledge of how to implement positive teaching strategies when implementing educational activities (positive reinforcement, fading of prompts, shaping and reinforcing successive approximations, task analysis, chaining, desensitization, incidental teaching, relaxation, rehearsal, generalization).

Heward, W. L. (2009). Self-monitoring helps students do more than just be on task. Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education (9thed., pp.428-429). Columbus, OH:Pearson.
Nounopoulos, A., Ruble, L., & Mathai, G. (2009). An ecological Approach to outpatient behavior management services for Children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Psychological Practice, 15(1), 178-216.

F. Knowledge of how to account for individual learning challenges such as generalization difficulties, over-selectivity, processing style, expressive and receptive communication difficulties, sensory and perceptual problems, and social interaction difficulties.

Quill, K. A. (2000). The Child’s Perspective. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 21-37). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

Quill, K. A. (2000). Strategies to Enhance Social and Communication Skills. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 111-160). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

G. Knowledge of communication strategies that effectively enhance competence for individuals with ASD.

Quill, K. A. (2000). The Child’s Perspective. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 21-37). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

Quill, K. A. (2000). Strategies to Enhance Social and Communication Skills. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 111-160). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

H. Knowledge of social interaction strategies that effectively enhance inclusion and self esteem for individuals with ASD.

Quill, K. A. (2000). The Child’s Perspective. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 21-37). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

Quill, K. A. (2000). Strategies to Enhance Social and Communication Skills. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 111-160). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

I. Knowledge of current teaching programs or strategies and when and how to effectively use these for individual students (e.g., applied behavior analysis, structured teaching, incidental teaching).

Quill, K. A. (2000). Strategies to Enhance Social and Communication Skills. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 111-160). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.


Area V: Positive Behavior Support

Nounopoulos, A., Ruble, L., & Mathai, G. (2009). An ecological Approach to outpatient behavior management services for Children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Psychological Practice, 15(1),178-216.

A. Knowledge of analysis of behavioral challenges encountered by students with ASD.

Quill, K. A. (2000). The Child’s Perspective. Do-Watch-Listen-Say (pp. 21-37). Essex, MA: Paul H Brookes.

B. Knowledge of a functional assessment of behavior and understanding the purposes of behavior.

Koegel, R. L., & Koegel, L. K. (2006). Combining functional assessment and self-management procedures to rapidly reduce disruptive behaviors. Pivotal Response Treatments for Autism (pp. 245-258). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

C. Knowledge of skills to teach to replace challenging behavior.

Heward, W. L. (2009). Self-monitoring helps students do more than just be on task. Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education (9thed., pp.428-429). Columbus, OH:Pearson.

D. Knowledge of data keeping and adjustments to a behavioral program.

National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (2009). Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Area VI: Medical Needs and Daily Living Skills

A. Knowledge of common medical issues encountered by individuals with ASD.

Thompson, T. (2007). Disabilities associated with autism spectrum disorders. Making Sense of Autism (pp. 173-185). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

B. Knowledge of common challenges of daily living encountered by individuals with ASD (sleeping, eating, toileting, understanding danger).

Autism Services Research Group (2004). Compass information series. University of Kentucky: College of Education.


Area VII: Collaboration with Parents

Ruble, L.A. & Akshoomoff. N. (2010). Autism Spectrum Disorders: Intervention options for parents and educators. Communique, 38, 29-30.

Ruble, L. A., & Dalrymple, N. J. (Summer 2002). COMPASS: A parent-teacher collaborative model for students with autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 17(2), 76-83.

A. Knowledge of ways to involve parents as partners in the educational process.

Wetherby, A. M., & Prizant, B. M. (2000). The experience of autism in the lives of families. Autism Spectrum Disorders (pp.369-393). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

B. Knowledge of ways to effectively share information and problem solve throughout the school year.

Nickels, C. (1996). A Gift from Alex- The Art of Belonging: Strategies for Academic & Social Inclusion. In, L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap, Positive Behavioral Support: Including People with Difficult Behavior in the Community (pp. 123-144). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.


Area VIII:  Involvement with School Personnel

Ruble, L.A. & Akshoomoff. N. (2010). Autism Spectrum Disorders: Intervention options for parents and educators. Communique, 38, 29-30.

A. Knowledge of ways to inform staff members about students with ASD and how they can be collaborative partners in the education of the students.

B. Knowledge of ways to share information and build a collaborative team for a student with ASD across all team members who work with the student.
Ruble, L. A., & Dalrymple, N. J. (Summer 2002). COMPASS: A parent-teacher collaborative model for students with autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 17(2), 76-83.

C. Knowledge of ways to build a team within the classroom and interface with teaching assistants to benefit students with ASD.
Walther-Thomas, C., Bryant, M., & Land, S. (1996). Planning for effective co-teaching the key to successful inclusion. Remedial and Special Education, 17(4), 255-264.